Volume 4, Issue 1, January 2016, Page: 1-7
Comparative Study of the Effects of Two Organic Manures on Soil Physico-Chemical Properties, and Yield of Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)
Muyang Rosaline Fosah, Department of Biology, Higher Teachers Training College (HTTC), the University of Bamenda, Bamenda, Cameroon; Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, University of Douala, Douala, Cameroon; Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, University of Douala, Douala, Cameroon
Mbouobda Hermann Desire, Department of Biology, Higher Teachers Training College (HTTC), the University of Bamenda, Bamenda, Cameroon; Laboratory of Plant Biology, Department of Biological Sciences, Ecole Normale Supérieure (ENS), University of Yaoundé 1, Yaounde, Cameroon
Fotso , Department of Biology, Higher Teachers Training College (HTTC), the University of Bamenda, Bamenda, Cameroon; Laboratory of Plant Biology, Department of Biological Sciences, Ecole Normale Supérieure (ENS), University of Yaoundé 1, Yaounde, Cameroon
Foasung-Zah Elvis, Department of Biology, Higher Teachers Training College (HTTC), the University of Bamenda, Bamenda, Cameroon
Taffouo Victor Desire, Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, University of Douala, Douala, Cameroon
Received: Nov. 20, 2015;       Accepted: Dec. 6, 2015;       Published: Feb. 19, 2016
DOI: 10.11648/j.plant.20160401.11      View  3373      Downloads  175
Abstract
A field experiment was conducted in Bambili, North West Region of Cameroon to evaluate the morphological and agronomic parameters of potato grown in soil treated with two organic manures as well as soil physico-chemical properties. A randomized complete block design (RCBD) with three treatments (EM manure, IMO manure and control), and four replications was conducted. Results showed significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) in the height of plants and leaf area index throughout the period of experiment in plants treated with both manures. IMO manure produced taller plants (65.150 ± 17.850 cm) compared to EM manure (57.642 ± 12.146 cm) and the control plants (19.070 ± 4.215 cm). The highest leaf area index was recorded by plants treated with IMO manure followed by those treated with EM manure, and then the control. The fresh weight of tubers produced by IMO manured plants (241.64 ± 32.94 g) was higher than those of EM manured plants (227.62 ± 44.58 g), and control (125.66 ± 31.63 g). Both IMO and EM manures had significant positive effects on soil physico-chemical properties, morphological parameters, and yields. However, IMO manure had better effects. Soil physico-chemical properties revealed a decrease in electrical conductivity, total phosphorus, calcium content and magnesium content. IMO treated soil recorded the higher rate of decrease, followed by EM treated soil and control soil, total organic carbon increased while total nitrogen content did not change during experiment for manure soils.
Keywords
Solanum tuberosum, Manures, Yield, Soil, Properties
To cite this article
Muyang Rosaline Fosah, Mbouobda Hermann Desire, Fotso , Foasung-Zah Elvis, Taffouo Victor Desire, Comparative Study of the Effects of Two Organic Manures on Soil Physico-Chemical Properties, and Yield of Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), Plant. Vol. 4, No. 1, 2016, pp. 1-7. doi: 10.11648/j.plant.20160401.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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