Volume 5, Issue 2, March 2017, Page: 42-46
An Ethnobotanical Survey of Wild Edible Plants Commercialized in Kefira Market, Dire Dawa City, Eastern Ethiopia
Atinafu Kebede, Department of Biology, College of Natural and Computational Sciences, Dire Dawa University, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia
Woynishet Tesfaye, Department of Biology, College of Natural and Computational Sciences, Dire Dawa University, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia
Molla Fentie, Department of Biology, College of Natural and Computational Sciences, Dire Dawa University, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia
Hanna Zewide, Department of Biology, College of Natural and Computational Sciences, Dire Dawa University, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia
Received: Dec. 20, 2016;       Accepted: Dec. 29, 2016;       Published: Mar. 2, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.plant.20170502.13      View  1737      Downloads  114
Abstract
Food insecurity and malnutrition affect much of the world’s population. Wild edible plants are known to make important contributions to the livelihoods of local communities of sub-Saharan Africa countries including Ethiopia. The populations in Ethiopia have a rich knowledge of consumption of wild edible plants and wild edible plants are still an integral part of the society in the country. An Ethnobotanical Survey of Wild Edible Plants Commercialized in Kefira Market, Dire Dawa City, Eastern Ethiopia was conducted with the aim of documenting the wild edible plants used by the community. Ethnobotanical data were collected from 29 informants using semi-structured interviews. A total of 22 wild edible plants belonging to 17 families were documented. Most of the wild edible plants were trees (81.82%), Fruits were the dominant edible parts (68%) followed by seed (18%) consumed by the people. The present paper provides basic information for better conservation, possibly for further exploitation of WEPs, and to preserve the traditional knowledge associated with WEPs for the future generation.
Keywords
Commercialized, Ethnobotany, Kefira, Wild Edible Plants
To cite this article
Atinafu Kebede, Woynishet Tesfaye, Molla Fentie, Hanna Zewide, An Ethnobotanical Survey of Wild Edible Plants Commercialized in Kefira Market, Dire Dawa City, Eastern Ethiopia, Plant. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2017, pp. 42-46. doi: 10.11648/j.plant.20170502.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Reference
[1]
Asfaw and Tadesse (2001). Prospects for sustainable use and development of wild food plant in Ethiopia. Economic Botany 55: 47-62.
[2]
Lulekal E, Asfaw Z, Kelbessa E, and Van Damme P (2011). Wild edible plants in Ethiopia: a review on their potential to combat food insecurity. Africa Focus, 24: 71–121.
[3]
Mohammed A, Kidanu A, Mohamed A, Asrat P, Abera K, Shemles, Befikadu Y, Zewdu M, Tesfaye A, Yohans, Birhanu G, Jemal M (2011). Dire Dawa Administration Program of Adaptation to Climate Change. DDAEPA. Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.
[4]
Hunde D., Njoka, J., Asfaw Z., and Nyangito, M., (2011). Wild Edible Fruits of Importance for Human Nutrition in Semiarid Parts of East Shewa Zone, Ethiopia: Associated Indigenous Knowledge and Implications to Food Security. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition 10 (1): 40-50.
[5]
Teklehaymanot and Giday (2010). Ethnobotanical study of wild edible plants of Kara and Kwego semi-pastoralist people in Lower Omo River Valley, Debub Omo Zone, SNNPR, Ethiopia. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 6: 23.
[6]
Wondimu T., Asfaw Z and Kelbessa E (2006). Ethnobotanical Study of Food Plants around 'Dheeraa' Town, Arsi, Ethiopia. SINET: Ethiop. J. Sci., 29 (1): 71–80.
[7]
Sharma, P., Agnihotry, A., Sharma, P. P and Sharma, L. (2013). Wild edibles of Murari Devi and surrounding areas in Mandi district of Himachal Pradesh, India. International Journal of Biodiversity and Conservation. 5 (9): 592-604
[8]
Balemie and Kebebew (2006). Ethnobotanical study of wild edible plants in Derashe and Kucha Districts, South Ethiopia. J EthnobiolEthnomed, 2: 53.
[9]
Ojelel and Kakudidi (2015). Wild edible plant species utilized by a subsistence farming community in Obalanga sub-county, Amuria district, UgandaJournal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 11: 7.
[10]
Sarvalingam A., Rajendran A., and Sivalingam R (2014). Wild edible plant resources used by the Iralus of the Maruthamalai Hills, Southern Western Ghats, Coimbature, Tamil Nadu, India. Indian journal of Natural products and resources, 5 (2): 198-201.
[11]
Rajeswar P., Jitu G., Ajit K. Tamuli R and RobindraT (2013). Ethnobotanical study of Wild Edible Plants in Poba Reserved Forest, Assam, India: Multiple Functions and Implications for Conservation. Research Journal of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences, 1 (3): 1-10.
[12]
Yan Ju., JingxianZhuo., Bo Liu and Chunlin Long (2013). Eating from the wild: diversity of wild edible plants used by Tibetans in Shangri-laregion, Yunnan, China. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 9: 28
[13]
Addis, G., K. Urga and D. Dikasso. (2005). Ethnobotanical study of edible wild plants in some selected districts of Ethiopia. Hum. Ecol., 33 (1): 83-118.
[14]
Asfaw Z, Tadesse M (2001). Prospects for sustainable use and development of wild food plants in Ethiopia. Economic Botany, 55, 47-62.
[15]
Ali M. S., Jamous R. M., Al-shafie J. H., Elgharabah W. A., Kherfan F. A., Qarariah K. H., Khdair I. S., Soos I. M., Musleh A. A., Isa B. A., Herzallah H. M., Khlaif R. B., Aiash S. M., Swaiti G. M., Abuzahra M. A., Haj-ali M. M., Saifi N. A., Azem H. K and Nasrallah H. A. (2008). Traditional knowledge of wild edible plants used in Palestine (Northen West Bank): A comparative study, J Ethnobiol Ethnomed, 4: 13.
Browse journals by subject